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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the president of the united states by more than 2 million votes, john. i don't believe it is a mandate. >> why isn't a mandate if it is such a big win? >> a mandate for what? a mandate to work together, certainly the entire country wants that. but the real fire bell in the night on this election is for the republican party. the
has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really uns
we know some of you are, you can also follow us tonight on our multichannel live stream. there can find up-to-the-minute results on our interactive map center. you can find a live election blog. you can find speeches from the winners and losers that will be coming along later tonight, and a whole lot more. >> ifill: here with us in our election night studio, which is very spiffy, if i say so myself, as they will be all evening long-- they're spiffy, too, and how long-- >> woodruff: especially when you see the overhead shot. >> ifill: mark shield, and david brooks, and michael beschloss, and richard norton smith, and we're going to talk among ourselves for just a moment what we see coming. what are you watching for, david? >> florida and virginia right now. you want-- >> ifill: do you have a white board? >> i wish i did. i'm not that spiffy. we talked a lot about ohio. but to get to ohio mitt romney has to hurdle florida and virginia. and we've really got no real information but little whiffes of information, looking pretty competitive in both places. so the romney people should be
, in the construction industry in this state have said they've never seen damage like this, so it's a new reality for us, and i think it's one that we're going to have to deal with. >> besides new york, new jersey was a victim of the disaster. governor chris christie reviewed the situation at the shoreline, president obama at his side. >> we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help you need until you've rebuilt. >> later, at a news conference, the governor gave his report. >> the president of the united states and i have had six conversations since sunday. that shows a level of caring and concern and interest that i think a leader should be giving to this type of situation. so today, in fact, reed asked me this after i got off, after you know, i said good-bye to him after air force one, this was as comfortable and relaxing interaction as i've had with the president siknown him, and i think it's because we're doing what we need to be done. >> are you surprised that the bipartisanship was there. >> the area the governor grew up in, the shore was de
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battleground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colorado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a dem
, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon had just come from the hospital. i heard it from the radio. i thought it was a tie. when i got to the studio i heard that cannady murdered him. tavis: the talk-show host is doing a new project,
. the 47% notion -- that is important to his presidency. >> nina, break it down for us. >> i do not think he has a mandate. i think the republicans and democrats both have a mandate for compromise. when you heard from republicans -- it is like mitch mcconnell who said his job was to see that obama is never reelected. so, he has an edge year. he does have leverage. but it will be a long haul. he does need partners. >> rich mcconnell is on record as saying that -- mitch mcconnell is on the record as saying that he knows that the election makes some people think that the republicans are going to roll over. that does not sound like compromise. >> your definition of compromise is rolling over and excepting higher tax rates. that is the democratic definition of compromise. i would never suggest bias. the president ran -- i will say it -- the most negative campaign. he did not run on his record. he could not. he did not run on a program. there is one thing he got a mandate for, and he now has a mandate to raise the top tax rate on two percent of the population by four. ? that is the smallest man
proposition 30. tell us what the judge decided. >> well, a judge decided that mysterious arizona group needed to disclose its donors or disclose them to the state. the group appealed. the disclose sure is still tied up, as we speak. the disclosure hasn't happened. and the state and the attorney general and the fair political practice commission has asked the state supreme court to make the group give them the document so they can examine it to see if they have to disclose the doe mores. all of this is happening right before the election and whether to be seen. it's $11 million, a lot of money, until you kind of back up and look at the larger macro-focus here. the map light foundation, which tracks campaign money, both in california and other parts of the country, came out with a number recently that they calculate $350 million on ballot measures alone this general election season in california, remember that doesn't include legislative congressional, anything else. 350 many ballot measures. prop 30, prop 32, this union paycheck protection measure and prop 37, in particular. about food labelin
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)